Health Matters

Superheroes of the Body: How Blood Fights Off Illness

Blood might seem like nothing more than a transport system, carrying oxygen and nutrients to your cells, but it's much more than that - it's also your body's superhero defence force.

The heroes of this story are white blood cells, produced in your bone marrow and found throughout your bloodstream. They have a single mission: to protect your body against harmful invaders like bacteria, viruses, and fungi.

Among these defenders, there are different types, each with a unique set of abilities. Neutrophils, the most common, are the first on the scene when an invader is detected. They engulf harmful bacteria and neutralise them. Meanwhile, lymphocytes, which include T-cells and B-cells, lead a more sophisticated attack. T-cells destroy infected cells, while B-cells produce antibodies that neutralise pathogens and 'remember' them, speeding up the response if the same invader attacks again.

Then we have monocytes, which transform into large cells called macrophages that swallow up both pathogens and dead or damaged body cells. Lastly, eosinophils and basophils play critical roles in combating parasitic infections and in allergic reactions.

So, the next time you feel under the weather, remember that you have an entire team of superheroes rushing to your defence. They work tirelessly, battling microscopic villains to keep you healthy. With such an extraordinary defence system within us, we're all more super than we realise!

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 Foods for Healthy Blood

Eating a balanced diet is crucial for overall health, but did you know certain foods are particularly beneficial for your blood? Here are our top ten picks:

  1. Leafy Green Vegetables: High in iron, they help in creating more haemoglobin in your blood, essential for transporting oxygen.
  2. Citrus Fruits: Packed with vitamin C, these fruits enhance iron absorption, contributing to healthy blood production.
  3. Red Meat: A great source of heme iron, which is more easily absorbed than the non-heme iron found in plants. But it needs needs to consumed in moderation.
  4. Legumes: Beans, lentils, and chickpeas are rich in iron and folate, a B vitamin crucial for red blood cell production.
  5. Seafood: Fatty fish like salmon are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help lower the 'bad' LDL cholesterol and raise the 'good' HDL cholesterol.
  6. Nuts and Seeds: High in fiber and healthy fats, they contribute to heart health by helping to regulate cholesterol.
  7. Whole Grains: Foods like oats and brown rice can help manage blood sugar levels and provide sustained energy.
  8. Poultry: Chicken and turkey provide lean protein and are a good source of vitamins like B12, necessary for healthy red blood cells.
  9. Beets: This red vegetable is high in nitrates and has been found to help lower blood pressure.
  10. Dark Chocolate: Good news for chocolate lovers! Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants that may help improve cholesterol levels.

Remember, a varied diet is key to obtaining all the nutrients your body needs. So next time you're grocery shopping, consider these foods for your heart and blood health!

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Vampires vs. Phlebotomists: Who Really Knows More About Blood?

When it comes to blood expertise, who would win between vampires and phlebotomists? The competition might be closer than you think!

Firstly, let's clear up some myths. Vampires are legendary creatures from folklore that survive by consuming the life essence (usually in the form of blood) of the living. On the other hand, phlebotomists are trained medical professionals who draw blood for medical testing, transfusions, or research.

While vampires are reputed to have an innate understanding of blood, phlebotomists have the edge when it comes to scientific knowledge. They understand the composition of blood, including the roles of red and white blood cells and platelets. They're also well-versed in the importance of blood types for safe transfusions.

Interestingly, both vampires and phlebotomists understand the importance of the circulatory system - although for very different reasons. Vampires need to find the carotid artery, their favourite snack spot, while phlebotomists must identify suitable veins for blood drawing.

Finally, while vampires may have a reputation for leaving two neat puncture wounds, phlebotomists can draw blood with minimal discomfort, using professional techniques and sterile equipment. Plus, they offer something vampires don't – the reassurance of helping diagnose and manage health conditions.

So, in this face-off, we have to award the victory to our real-life heroes, the phlebotomists. While vampire stories are thrilling and full of intrigue, when it comes to understanding blood and using it to save lives, the true experts are those in our healthcare system.

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Demystifying Blood Tests: What Your Results Really Mean

Blood tests can often seem like a mystery. You know they're essential for diagnosing illnesses and checking your health, but what do all those numbers and terms mean? Let's shed some light on it.

Firstly, a complete blood count (CBC) is a standard blood test that measures different components of your blood. This includes red blood cells, which carry oxygen; white blood cells, which fight infections; and platelets, which help in clotting. Unusual counts can indicate issues like anaemia, infections, clotting problems, and certain cancers.

Then there's cholesterol. You've probably heard about 'good' and 'bad' cholesterol - but what's the difference? LDL (Low-Density Lipoprotein) is known as the 'bad' cholesterol because high levels can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries. HDL (High-Density Lipoprotein), or 'good' cholesterol, helps remove LDL from your bloodstream. A healthy balance between these two is crucial for cardiovascular health.

Another common measurement is blood glucose, crucial for diagnosing and managing diabetes. If your fasting blood glucose is high, it means your body isn't effectively using insulin to manage sugar levels, indicating possible diabetes.

Blood tests also check for specific markers like PSA (Prostate-Specific Antigen) for prostate health, TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) for thyroid function, and various vitamin and mineral levels for nutritional deficiencies.

Remember, while it's good to understand your results, always consult with a healthcare professional for accurate interpretation. And next time you get a blood test, you won't feel like you're reading a foreign language!

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Unveiling the Mysteries of Your Blood Type

"What's your blood type?" It's a common question, yet many of us don't fully understand what our answer means.

In the world of blood types, there are four main characters: A, B, AB, and O, with a sidekick known as the Rh factor that can be either positive or negative. This leads to eight possible blood types.

The 'type' of blood you have refers to the presence or absence of antigens, which are specific molecules on the surface of red blood cells. If you have Type A blood, your red cells have A antigens. For Type B, it's B antigens. Type AB has both, and Type O has none. The Rh factor is another antigen – if it's present, you're Rh positive; if it's not, you're Rh negative.

But why do these types exist? The exact reason remains somewhat of a mystery. Some researchers believe different blood types may have evolved as a defense mechanism against diseases. Others think our ancestors' diet and environmental factors might have played a role.

Interestingly, certain blood types have unique roles in medical scenarios. For instance, Type O Negative blood is highly valuable as it can be donated to individuals of any blood type - earning it the title of 'universal donor.' Conversely, individuals with AB Positive blood are 'universal recipients,' as they can receive blood from any type.

By understanding the intricacies of blood types, we gain a deeper appreciation of our bodies' complex biological systems. So, the next time someone asks about your blood type, remember, it's not just about a letter or two – it's a glimpse into the fascinating world of human genetics and evolution!

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

A Day in the Life of Your Blood Cells

Have you ever stopped to think about the bustling microcosm within you? Your blood cells, although small, are constantly at work, ensuring that your body functions without a hitch.

A day in the life of a red blood cell is like being a globe-trotting delivery man. It starts its journey in your heart, and with a forceful push, it's propelled into the wild rapids of your circulatory system. Its mission: to deliver life-sustaining oxygen from your lungs to every tiny cell in your body. Once it completes a drop-off, it doesn't rest – it picks up carbon dioxide waste and swiftly carries it back to the lungs for disposal. This exhausting round-trip lasts about 120 days, after which these little workers retire, and a fresh batch takes over.

Now let's consider the white blood cells, your body's very own vigilante squad. These cells are always on high alert, patrolling the highways and byways of your bloodstream for harmful intruders. Should they detect a malicious bacterium or virus, they spring into action. They neutralise the threat by engulfing it and then send out chemical signals to recruit more immune cells to the battlefront. The life of a white blood cell is marked by constant vigilance and heroic battles.

Then there are the platelets, your body's first responders. These are not cells in the traditional sense but rather tiny fragments of cells that act as the body's repair team. When there's a cut or scrape, they rush to the scene like a construction crew. Working together, they create a clot by forming a mesh that traps other blood cells, effectively plugging the leak and allowing the healing process to begin.

So, the next time you're taking a moment to relax, remember there's a dedicated team inside you that's tirelessly working. The incredible journey of your blood cells, from delivering oxygen to defending against disease and healing wounds, is truly a marvel of nature!

May 23,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Why am I bleeding on the pill when I shouldn't be?
Are you experiencing unexpected bleeding while taking the pill? This can be a frustrating and concerning experience, but it's important to understand that it's not uncommon. There are several reasons why you may be experiencing bleeding while on the pill, and in this article, we'll explore the top reasons.
  1. Hormonal fluctuations: While the pill is designed to regulate your hormones and prevent ovulation, it's possible for your hormone levels to fluctuate and cause breakthrough bleeding.
  2. Missed pills: If you miss a pill or take it at a different time than usual, it can disrupt your hormone levels and lead to bleeding.
  3. Starting a new pill: When starting a new pill or switching to a different one, your body may need time to adjust to the new hormone levels, leading to breakthrough bleeding.
  4. Infection: In some cases, bleeding while on the pill can be a symptom of an underlying infection or sexually transmitted infection.
  5. Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions such as thyroid problems or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can cause bleeding while on the pill.
If you're experiencing bleeding while on the pill, it's important to talk to your doctor to determine the underlying cause. Alternatively our General Health MOT or Female Fertility Test could help you find some answers. Depending on the cause, they may recommend adjusting your dosage, switching to a different pill, or conducting further tests to rule out underlying medical conditions. By understanding the top reasons for bleeding while on the pill, you can take steps to manage your symptoms and ensure your continued health and well-being.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Why am I bleeding after sex?
Have you noticed bleeding after having sex? This can be a scary and uncomfortable experience, but it's important to understand that it's not uncommon. There are several reasons why you may be experiencing bleeding after sex, and in this article, we'll explore the top reasons.
  1. Cervical ectropion: This condition occurs when the cells lining the cervix grow outside of the cervix, making them more susceptible to bleeding during sex.
  2. Vaginal dryness: Insufficient lubrication during sex can cause friction and small tears in the vaginal tissues, leading to bleeding.
  3. Infection: Sexually transmitted infections such as chlamydia or gonorrhea can cause bleeding after sex, along with other symptoms such as pain or discharge.
  4. Menopause: As hormone levels shift during menopause, the vaginal tissues can become thinner and more prone to bleeding during sex.
  5. Polyps or fibroids: These benign growths in the uterus or cervix can cause bleeding during sex, along with other symptoms such as heavy or irregular periods.
  6. Cancer: In rare cases, bleeding after sex can be a symptom of cervical or uterine cancer.
If you're experiencing bleeding after sex, it's important to talk to a doctor and do some blood tests to determine the underlying cause. Treatment options may vary depending on the cause, and can range from medication to surgery. By understanding the top reasons for bleeding after sex, you can take steps to improve your comfort and overall health. Don't hesitate to seek medical attention if you're concerned or if the bleeding persists.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons you are peeing so much
Do you find yourself constantly running to the bathroom to pee, even when you haven't had much to drink? Frequent urination can be a symptom of an underlying health issue, and can be both inconvenient and uncomfortable. In this article, we'll explore the top 10 reasons for why you may be peeing so much.
  1. Urinary tract infection (UTI): This common infection can cause painful and frequent urination, along with other symptoms such as burning during urination and cloudy urine.
  2. Overactive bladder: This condition is characterized by a sudden and urgent need to urinate, often accompanied by leakage or incontinence.
  3. Diabetes: High blood sugar levels can cause increased urination as your body attempts to remove excess glucose from your system.
  4. Prostate issues: In men, an enlarged prostate or prostate infection can cause frequent urination and difficulty emptying the bladder.
  5. Interstitial cystitis: This chronic bladder condition can cause frequent and painful urination, along with pelvic pain.
  6. Bladder cancer: In rare cases, frequent urination can be a symptom of bladder cancer.
  7. Medications: Certain medications, such as diuretics and some antidepressants, can cause increased urination as a side effect.
  8. Pregnancy: As your uterus expands during pregnancy, it can put pressure on your bladder and cause you to pee more frequently.
  9. Anxiety or stress: High levels of stress or anxiety can increase the production of urine, leading to more frequent urination.
  10. Excessive fluid intake: Consuming large amounts of fluids, especially caffeinated or alcoholic beverages, can cause you to pee more frequently.
If you're experiencing frequent urination, it's important to talk to your doctor to determine the underlying cause or you could do our Diabetes Screening Test as a first step. Treatment options may vary depending on the cause, and can range from medication to lifestyle changes. By understanding the top 10 reasons for frequent urination, you can take steps to improve your comfort and overall health.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you’re always so cold
Do you find yourself constantly reaching for a sweater or blanket, even when others around you are comfortable? Feeling cold all the time can be frustrating and uncomfortable, and can be a sign of an underlying health issue. In this article, we'll explore the top 10 reasons for why you may always feel cold.
  1. Anemia: Low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin can cause you to feel cold, as your body struggles to distribute oxygen to your tissues.
  2. Thyroid issues: Hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid, can slow down your metabolism and cause you to feel cold.
  3. Raynaud's disease: This condition causes blood vessels in your fingers and toes to narrow in response to stress or cold temperatures, leading to cold and numbness in these areas.
  4. Poor circulation: Issues with blood flow, such as peripheral artery disease or blood clots, can cause you to feel cold.
  5. Vitamin deficiencies: Low levels of vitamins D, B12, or folate can affect your body's ability to regulate temperature.
  6. Dehydration: Not drinking enough water can cause your body to conserve heat, leading to feeling cold.
  7. Medications: Certain medications, such as beta blockers and antidepressants, can cause you to feel cold as a side effect.
  8. Low body fat: Having a low body fat percentage can cause you to feel cold more easily, as fat helps insulate the body.
  9. Stress: High levels of stress can cause your body to release adrenaline, which can lead to feeling cold.
  10. Aging: As you age, your body may have a harder time regulating temperature, leading to feeling cold more often.
If you're always feeling cold, it's important to talk to your doctor to determine the underlying cause or you could do our General Health MOT as a first step. In some cases, lifestyle changes such as staying hydrated, improving nutrition, and staying physically active can help improve circulation and regulate body temperature. By understanding the top 10 reasons for feeling cold, you can take steps to improve your comfort and overall health.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you can’t get hard or stay hard (Erectile Dysfunction)
As a man, experiencing erectile dysfunction (ED) can be frustrating and even embarrassing. ED is a common condition that can be caused by a variety of factors. In this article, we'll explore the top 10 reasons for ED, including both physical and psychological factors.
  1. Cardiovascular disease: Conditions that affect blood flow, such as high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and heart disease, can contribute to ED.
  2. Diabetes: High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and nerves, leading to ED.
  3. Hormonal imbalances: Low testosterone levels and other hormonal imbalances can affect sexual function and lead to ED.
  4. Obesity: Being overweight or obese can contribute to a range of health problems, including ED.
  5. Medications: Certain medications, such as antidepressants, blood pressure medications, and antihistamines, can cause ED as a side effect.
  6. Alcohol and drug use: Excessive alcohol and drug use can affect sexual function and lead to ED.
  7. Smoking: Smoking damages blood vessels and can contribute to ED.
  8. Psychological factors: Stress, anxiety, and depression can all contribute to ED.
  9. Aging: As men age, they may experience a natural decline in sexual function, which can contribute to ED.
  10. Trauma or injury: Injuries or trauma to the pelvic area, spinal cord, or genitals can affect sexual function and lead to ED.
It's important to remember that ED is a treatable condition. If you are experiencing ED, book our Men’s Sexual Health blood test or talk to our doctors about possible causes and treatment options. Lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, quitting smoking, and reducing alcohol and drug use, may also help improve sexual function. By understanding the top 10 reasons for ED, you can take steps to improve your sexual health and overall well-being.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

What is Gonorrhoea? Symptoms, Implications, Causes, Treatment and Prevention
Gonorrhoea is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It can affect both men and women and is spread through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. In this article, we'll explore the symptoms, potential implications, causes, treatment, and prevention of gonorrhoea. Symptoms: Many people with gonorrhoea do not experience any symptoms, which is why it's often referred to as a "silent" infection. However, some of the common symptoms of gonorrhoea include:
  • Painful urination
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge (in women)
  • Pain or discharge from the penis (in men)
  • Rectal pain, discharge, or bleeding (if the infection is in the rectum)
  • Sore throat (if the infection is in the throat)
Potential implications: If left untreated, gonorrhoea can lead to serious health complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women, which can cause infertility, chronic pain, and ectopic pregnancy. In men, untreated gonorrhoea can lead to epididymitis, an inflammation of the testicles that can cause pain and infertility. Gonorrhoea can also increase the risk of HIV transmission. Causes: Gonorrhoea is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and is transmitted through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. It can also be passed from a pregnant woman to her baby during childbirth. Treatment: Gonorrhoea can be treated with antibiotics. It's important to complete the full course of antibiotics as directed by your doctor to ensure that the infection is fully cleared. Prevention: The best way to prevent gonorrhoea is to practice safe sex by using condoms during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. It's also important to get tested regularly for STIs, especially if you are sexually active with multiple partners. If you are diagnosed with gonorrhoea, it's important to inform your sexual partners so that they can also get tested and treated if necessary. By understanding the symptoms, potential implications, causes, treatment, and prevention of gonorrhoea, you can take steps to protect yourself and your sexual partners from this common and potentially serious STI. Remember to speak with a doctor if you have any concerns or questions about STI prevention and treatment.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

What is Chlamydia? Symptoms, Implications, Causes, Treatment and Prevention
Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis. It is one of the most common STIs worldwide and can be easily transmitted during unprotected sexual activity. In this article, we'll explore the symptoms, potential implications, causes, treatment, and prevention of chlamydia. Symptoms: Many people with chlamydia do not experience any symptoms, which is why it's often referred to as a "silent" infection. However, some of the common symptoms of chlamydia include:
  • Painful urination
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge
  • Pain during sex
  • Rectal pain, discharge or bleeding (if the infection is in the rectum)
Potential implications: If left untreated, chlamydia can lead to serious health complications, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women, which can cause infertility, chronic pain, and ectopic pregnancy. In men, untreated chlamydia can lead to epididymitis, an inflammation of the testicles that can cause pain and infertility. Causes: Chlamydia is caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis and is transmitted through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. It can also be passed from a pregnant woman to her baby during childbirth. Treatment: Chlamydia can be treated with antibiotics. It's important to complete the full course of antibiotics as directed by a doctor to ensure that the infection is fully cleared. Prevention: The best way to prevent chlamydia is to practice safe sex by using condoms during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. It's also important to get tested regularly for STIs, especially if you are sexually active with multiple partners. If you are diagnosed with chlamydia, it's important to inform your sexual partners so that they can also get tested and treated if necessary. By understanding the symptoms, potential implications, causes, treatment, and prevention of chlamydia, you can take steps to protect yourself and your sexual partners from this common and potentially serious STI. Remember to speak with a doctor if you have any concerns or questions about STI prevention and treatment.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 5 reasons why you might be so thirsty
Feeling thirsty is a normal response to dehydration or a need for fluids, but if you're feeling thirsty all the time, it may be a sign of an underlying health issue. In this article, we'll explore some of the common reasons why you might be feeling excessively thirsty and offer tips to help you stay hydrated.
  1. Dehydration: The most common reason for feeling thirsty is simply not drinking enough water. Make sure to drink enough water throughout the day, especially during hot weather or physical activity.
  2. Diabetes: High blood sugar levels can cause frequent urination, leading to dehydration and increased thirst. If you're experiencing persistent thirst, it's important to speak with a doctor to get tested for diabetes.
  3. Certain medications: Certain medications, such as diuretics or antihistamines, can cause dry mouth and increased thirst. If you're taking medication and experiencing excessive thirst, speak with a doctor.
  4. Dry mouth: Dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, can be caused by a variety of factors, from medication to medical conditions. If you're experiencing dry mouth and increased thirst, it's important to speak with a doctor.
  5. Anaemia: Anaemia, or low levels of red blood cells, can cause fatigue, weakness, and increased thirst. If you're experiencing these symptoms, it's important to speak with a doctor or do a blood test as a first step.
By identifying the underlying cause of your excessive thirst and making lifestyle changes or seeking medical treatment, you can manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life. Remember to speak with a doctor if you're experiencing persistent or concerning symptoms related to thirst or hydration.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 5 reason why you’re farting so much
Excessive flatulence, or farting, is a common condition that can be embarrassing and uncomfortable. While passing gas is a normal bodily function, excessive flatulence can be caused by a variety of factors, from diet to medical conditions. In this article, we'll explore some of the common causes of excessive flatulence and offer tips and strategies to help you manage your symptoms.
  1. Diet: Certain foods, such as beans, broccoli, and dairy products, can be difficult to digest and can make you feel gassy. It's important to identify which foods trigger your symptoms and avoid or limit them.
  2. Eating too quickly: Eating too quickly can cause you to swallow air, leading to increased flatulence. It's important to eat slowly and chew your food thoroughly.
  3. Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease, and lactose intolerance, can cause excessive flatulence. If you're experiencing persistent or uncomfortable symptoms, it's important to speak with a doctor and do a blood test.
  4. Antibiotics: Antibiotics can disrupt the natural balance of bacteria in your gut, leading to increased flatulence. If you're taking antibiotics, consider taking a probiotic supplement to help restore your gut bacteria.
  5. Constipation: Constipation can cause gas to build up in your intestines, leading to increased flatulence. It's important to eat a fiber-rich diet and stay hydrated to help prevent constipation.
By identifying the underlying cause of your excessive flatulence and making lifestyle changes or seeking medical treatment, you can manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life. Remember to speak with a doctor and do a blood test if you're experiencing persistent or concerning symptoms related to flatulence or digestive issues.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you might be feeling constantly hungry
Feeling hungry is a natural part of the body's response to a lack of food or energy, but if you find yourself feeling hungry all the time, it can be frustrating and difficult to manage. There are several possible reasons why you might be experiencing constant hunger, from lifestyle factors to underlying medical conditions. In this article, we'll explore ten common reasons why you might be feeling constantly hungry, and offer tips and strategies to help you manage your hunger levels.
  1. You're not eating enough protein: Protein is an essential nutrient that helps keep you feeling full and satisfied, so it's important to include protein-rich foods in your diet.
  2. You're not getting enough fiber: Fiber helps slow down the digestion of food, keeping you feeling full for longer periods of time.
  3. You're not drinking enough water: Dehydration can be mistaken for hunger, so it's important to stay hydrated throughout the day.
  4. You're not getting enough sleep: Lack of sleep can disrupt hormones that regulate hunger, leading to increased appetite and cravings.
  5. You're not eating enough healthy fats: Healthy fats, such as those found in nuts, seeds, and avocados, can help keep you feeling full and satisfied.
  6. You're consuming too many refined carbohydrates: Refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and sugary snacks, can cause blood sugar spikes and crashes, leading to increased hunger.
  7. You're not eating enough at meals: Skipping meals or eating too few calories can leave you feeling constantly hungry.
  8. You're not managing stress effectively: Stress can increase the production of hormones that stimulate appetite, leading to increased hunger.
  9. You have an underlying medical condition: Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes or thyroid disorders, can affect hunger levels. A blood test can help you figure out if you have any underlying medical conditions affecting your appetite.
  10. You're not getting enough exercise: Exercise can help regulate appetite and improve metabolism, helping to control hunger levels.
By addressing these common causes of constant hunger, you can better manage your appetite and avoid overeating. Remember to talk to a doctor if you're experiencing persistent or concerning symptoms related to hunger or eating, as they can help you identify the underlying cause and recommend appropriate treatment options.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you’re struggling to fall asleep
Getting enough quality sleep is essential for good health and wellbeing, but many people struggle to fall asleep or stay asleep throughout the night. If you're having trouble sleeping, there are several possible reasons why, from lifestyle factors to underlying medical conditions. In this article, we'll explore ten common reasons why you might not be able to sleep, and offer tips and strategies to help you improve your sleep habits.
  1. You're not sticking to a consistent sleep schedule: Going to bed and waking up at different times each day can disrupt your body's natural sleep-wake cycle, making it harder to fall asleep and stay asleep.
  2. You're consuming caffeine or alcohol too close to bedtime: Caffeine and alcohol can interfere with your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep, so it's best to avoid them in the hours leading up to bedtime.
  3. You're not creating a comfortable sleep environment: Factors like noise, light, temperature, and the quality of your mattress and pillows can all impact your ability to sleep well.
  4. You're experiencing high levels of stress or anxiety: Stress and anxiety can make it difficult to fall asleep, and can also lead to nightmares or disrupted sleep throughout the night.
  5. You're not getting enough exercise: Regular exercise can help you fall asleep more easily and improve the quality of your sleep.
  6. You're eating a heavy meal too close to bedtime: Eating a large meal or snacks that are high in fat or sugar too close to bedtime can disrupt your digestion and make it harder to sleep.
  7. You're using electronic devices before bed: The blue light emitted by electronic devices like smartphones and tablets can disrupt your body's natural sleep-wake cycle, making it harder to fall asleep.
  8. You have an underlying medical condition: Certain medical conditions, such as sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or depression, can interfere with your ability to sleep. A blood test can help you figure out if you have any underlying medical conditions affecting your sleep.
  9. You're taking medications that interfere with sleep: Some medications, such as certain antidepressants or pain medications, can disrupt your sleep patterns.
  10. You're not winding down before bed: Engaging in calming activities, such as reading or meditation, before bed can help you relax and prepare for sleep.
By addressing these common barriers to sleep, you can improve your chances of getting the quality rest you need to feel your best. Remember to talk to a doctor if you're experiencing persistent sleep difficulties, as they can help you identify the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you’re not losing weight
Struggling to lose weight can be frustrating, especially if you've been working hard to make healthy changes. However, there are several factors that can contribute to difficulty losing weight, and identifying the underlying cause is essential to making progress towards your weight loss goals. In this article, we'll explore ten common reasons why you might not be losing weight, and offer tips and strategies to help you overcome these challenges.
  1. You're not eating enough: Cutting calories is an essential part of weight loss, but if you're not eating enough, your body may go into "starvation mode" and hold onto fat.
  2. You're not getting enough protein: Protein is essential for building and repairing muscle tissue, and can also help you feel full and satisfied, making it easier to stick to a healthy diet.
  3. You're not getting enough sleep: Poor sleep can disrupt hormone levels, increase appetite, and reduce your energy levels, making it harder to stick to your weight loss goals.
  4. You're not drinking enough water: Drinking water can help you feel full and reduce hunger cravings, as well as supporting healthy digestion and metabolism.
  5. You're not tracking your food intake: Without a clear understanding of what and how much you're eating, it can be challenging to make meaningful changes to your diet and achieve sustainable weight loss.
  6. You're not incorporating strength training: Strength training can help you build muscle mass, which can boost your metabolism and help you burn more calories throughout the day.
  7. You're eating too many processed foods: Processed foods tend to be high in calories, unhealthy fats, and added sugars, making it harder to lose weight and achieve optimal health.
  8. You're not managing stress: Chronic stress can disrupt hormone levels, increase inflammation, and lead to overeating or unhealthy food choices.
  9. You have an underlying medical condition: Certain medical conditions, such as hypothyroidism or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), can make it harder to lose weight. Doing a blood test can help understand if you have any underlying conditions stopping you from losing weight.
  10. You're not being patient: Sustainable weight loss takes time and effort, and it's essential to have realistic expectations and focus on making lasting lifestyle changes.
By addressing these common roadblocks to weight loss, you can improve your chances of success and achieve your health and wellness goals. Remember to be patient and persistent, and to work closely with your doctor to develop a safe and effective weight loss plan that works for you.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Top 10 reasons why you might be feeling tired
Fatigue is a common complaint, and there are many potential reasons why you might be feeling tired. Understanding the possible causes of fatigue can help you take steps to address the issue and improve your overall health and wellbeing. In this regard, here are ten common health-related reasons why you might be feeling tired.
  1. Lack of sleep: Not getting enough quality sleep can leave you feeling tired and sluggish during the day.
  2. Sleep apnea: This condition causes you to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, leading to poor sleep quality and daytime fatigue.
  3. Anemia: Anemia is a condition where your body doesn't have enough red blood cells, which can cause fatigue and weakness.
  4. Thyroid problems: Both an overactive and underactive thyroid can cause fatigue and other symptoms.
  5. Chronic fatigue syndrome: This is a complex disorder characterised by extreme fatigue that isn't relieved by rest.
  6. Depression: Depression can cause a variety of physical symptoms, including fatigue and low energy levels.
  7. Dehydration: Not drinking enough fluids can lead to dehydration, which can cause fatigue and other symptoms.
  8. Diabetes: High blood sugar levels can cause fatigue, as well as other symptoms such as increased thirst and frequent urination.
  9. Chronic pain: Living with chronic pain can be exhausting, and can make it difficult to get the restful sleep you need to feel refreshed.
  10. Poor diet: Eating a diet that is high in sugar, processed foods, and unhealthy fats can leave you feeling tired and sluggish.
These are just a few of the many possible reasons why you might be feeling tired. It's important to talk to a doctor or book a blood test if you're experiencing persistent fatigue or other symptoms that are impacting your quality of life.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Full Blood Count (Blood Profile): Understanding the Test and Tips for Improving Blood Health
What is Full Blood Count (Blood Profile)? Full Blood Count (FBC), also known as Blood Profile or Complete Blood Count (CBC), is a blood test that measures several components of your blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The test is used to evaluate your overall health and detect various conditions, such as anemia, infections, and blood cancers. What does a Full Blood Count (Blood Profile) consist of ? A Full Blood Count typically consists of the following components:
  1. Hemoglobin (Hb): A protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to your body's tissues.
  2. Hematocrit (Hct): The percentage of red blood cells in your blood.
  3. Red Blood Cells (RBCs): Cells that carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues.
  4. Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV): The average size of your red blood cells.
  5. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH): The amount of hemoglobin in your red blood cells.
  6. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC): The concentration of hemoglobin in your red blood cells.
  7. White Blood Cells (WBCs): Cells that fight infection and disease.
  8. Platelets: Cells that help with blood clotting.
How is a Full Blood Count (Blood Profile) performed ? A Full Blood Count (Blood Profile) is performed by drawing blood from a vein in your arm. The sample is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. How can you improve your blood health? There are several things you can do to improve your blood health:
  1. Eat a balanced diet: A diet rich in iron, vitamin B12, and folate can help improve your blood health. Iron-rich foods include red meat, beans, and leafy greens. Vitamin B12 is found in animal products, such as meat, fish, and dairy. Folate is found in leafy greens, citrus fruits, and fortified grains.
  2. Stay hydrated: Drinking enough water can help keep your blood volume at a healthy level.
  3. Exercise regularly: Regular exercise can help increase the number of red blood cells in your body and improve circulation.
  4. Avoid smoking: Smoking can damage blood vessels and reduce oxygen supply to your body's tissues.
  5. Manage stress: Chronic stress can lead to high blood pressure and inflammation, which can damage blood vessels.
  6. Get enough sleep: Sleep helps your body produce red blood cells and repair damaged blood vessels.
In conclusion, Full Blood Count (Blood Profile) is a blood test that measures several components of your blood and is used to evaluate your overall health. By following a balanced diet, staying hydrated, exercising regularly, avoiding smoking, managing stress, and getting enough sleep, you can improve your blood health and prevent various conditions. It's important to talk to your doctor about any concerns you may have about your blood health and to follow their recommendations for testing and treatment.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Understanding Oestrogen: Its Role in the Body and How to Maintain Healthy Levels
Oestrogen is a hormone that plays a vital role in the reproductive system and overall health. Below, we answer some common questions about oestrogen. What is oestrogen, and what does it do? Oestrogen is a hormone that is primarily produced in the ovaries in women and in smaller amounts in men's testes. It plays a crucial role in the development of female secondary sexual characteristics, such as breasts and pubic hair, as well as in regulating the menstrual cycle. It also helps to maintain healthy bones and cholesterol levels. What are the different types of oestrogen? There are three primary types of oestrogen: estrone, estradiol, and estriol. Estradiol is the most potent form of oestrogen and is the primary form produced by the ovaries during reproductive years. What are the symptoms of low oestrogen levels? Low oestrogen levels can cause a range of symptoms, including irregular menstrual cycles, hot flashes, vaginal dryness, decreased libido, and mood changes. In women, low oestrogen levels can also lead to bone loss and an increased risk of osteoporosis. What are the causes of low oestrogen levels? Low oestrogen levels can be caused by a variety of factors, including menopause, premature ovarian failure, certain medications, and some medical conditions. How can I maintain healthy oestrogen levels? Eating a healthy diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help to maintain healthy oestrogen levels. Regular exercise can also help to regulate hormone levels. If you are experiencing symptoms of low oestrogen levels, your doctor may recommend hormone replacement therapy. Are there any risks associated with hormone replacement therapy? Like all medications, hormone replacement therapy can have risks and side effects. Women who take hormone replacement therapy may have an increased risk of breast cancer, blood clots, and stroke. It is essential to discuss the potential risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy with your doctor before starting treatment. In summary, oestrogen is a crucial hormone that plays a vital role in reproductive and overall health. Maintaining healthy levels of oestrogen through a healthy diet, regular exercise, and medical treatment if necessary, can help to prevent the symptoms associated with low oestrogen levels. If you are experiencing symptoms of low oestrogen, talk to your doctor about your treatment options.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Cholesterol: Understanding Its Role in Your Health and How to Lower Your Levels
Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is found in all cells of the body. While it is essential for many bodily functions, having high levels of cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease. Below, we answer some common questions about cholesterol. What is cholesterol, and why is it important? Cholesterol is a type of fat that your body needs to function properly. It helps to build cells, produce hormones, and digest food. However, having high levels of cholesterol can increase your risk of developing heart disease. What are the different types of cholesterol? There are two main types of cholesterol: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL is often referred to as "bad" cholesterol because it can build up in the walls of your arteries and lead to blockages. HDL, on the other hand, is often referred to as "good" cholesterol because it helps to remove excess cholesterol from your bloodstream. What causes high cholesterol levels? High cholesterol levels can be caused by a variety of factors, including an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, smoking, and genetics. What are the symptoms of high cholesterol? High cholesterol does not usually cause any symptoms. That is why it is important to get your cholesterol levels checked regularly. How can I lower my cholesterol levels? There are several ways to lower your cholesterol levels, including making dietary changes, getting regular exercise, quitting smoking, and taking medication. Eating a diet that is low in saturated and trans fats, increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables, and incorporating more whole grains into your diet can all help to lower your cholesterol levels. How often should I get my cholesterol levels checked? The American Heart Association recommends getting your cholesterol levels checked every four to six years if you are a healthy adult. If you have risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or a family history of heart disease, you may need to get your cholesterol levels checked more frequently. Are there any side effects of cholesterol-lowering medications? Like all medications, cholesterol-lowering drugs can have side effects. Common side effects include muscle pain and liver damage. However, these side effects are rare, and the benefits of cholesterol-lowering medication usually outweigh the risks. In summary, cholesterol is an essential substance that your body needs to function properly. However, having high levels of cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease. Making lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise can help to lower your cholesterol levels. Don't forget to get your cholesterol levels checked regularly to ensure that you are staying healthy.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Get Your Heart Pumping: The Best Exercises for Improving Cardiovascular Health
Improving cardiovascular health is essential for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Exercise is a crucial part of achieving this goal. Below, we answer some common questions about the best exercises for improving cardiovascular health. What types of exercise are best for improving cardiovascular health? Aerobic exercise, also known as cardio, is the most effective type of exercise for improving cardiovascular health. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, and dancing. How much aerobic exercise do I need to do to improve my cardiovascular health? The American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week to improve cardiovascular health. This can be achieved through activities like brisk walking or cycling. What are the benefits of aerobic exercise for cardiovascular health? Aerobic exercise can improve the health of your heart and lungs, increase your endurance, and lower your risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Can strength training also improve cardiovascular health? While strength training can improve overall fitness, it is not as effective as aerobic exercise for improving cardiovascular health. However, incorporating strength training into your exercise routine can still provide many benefits, such as improving bone density and reducing the risk of injury. What are some other ways to improve cardiovascular health? In addition to aerobic exercise, maintaining a healthy diet, avoiding smoking, and managing stress can all contribute to improving cardiovascular health. Are there any risks associated with exercising for cardiovascular health? While exercise is generally safe for most people, it is important to consult with your doctor before starting a new exercise routine, especially if you have any pre-existing health conditions. In summary, aerobic exercise is the most effective type of exercise for improving cardiovascular health. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week, and consider incorporating strength training and healthy lifestyle habits for even greater benefits. Don't forget to consult with your doctor before starting any new exercise routine.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

What can I do to improve my overall health?
What can I do to improve my overall health? Improving your overall health is an important goal, and it starts with making positive changes in your lifestyle. Here are some steps you can take to improve your health:
  1. Eat a balanced diet: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can provide your body with the nutrients it needs to function properly. It is also important to limit your intake of processed foods, sugary drinks, and saturated fats.
  2. Get regular exercise: Exercise can help improve your cardiovascular health, strengthen your muscles and bones, and improve your mood. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week.
  3. Manage stress: Chronic stress can have negative effects on your physical and mental health. Finding ways to manage stress, such as through meditation, yoga, or deep breathing exercises, can help improve your overall health.
  4. Get enough sleep: Sleep is important for your overall health and well-being. Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep per night. If you are having trouble sleeping, talk to your doctor.
  5. Avoid harmful habits: Smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and drug use can have negative effects on your health. Quitting smoking and reducing your alcohol consumption can improve your health in many ways.
  6. Get regular check-ups and blood tests: Regular check-ups and blood tests can help identify potential health problems and allow for early intervention. Some important blood tests for overall health include a full blood count, lipid profile, blood glucose test, and thyroid function test.
What is a full blood count? A full blood count (FBC) is a blood test that measures the number and types of cells in your blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. This test can help diagnose conditions such as anemia, infection, and leukemia. What is a lipid profile? A lipid profile is a blood test that measures the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in your blood. High levels of cholesterol and triglycerides can increase your risk of heart disease, so it is important to get this test done regularly. What is a blood glucose test? A blood glucose test measures the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. High levels of glucose can indicate diabetes, a condition that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. What is a thyroid function test? A thyroid function test measures the level of thyroid hormones in your blood. These hormones regulate many of your body's functions, including metabolism, heart rate, and body temperature. An abnormal thyroid function test result can indicate a thyroid problem, which can be treated with medication. In summary, improving your overall health requires a commitment to making positive changes in your lifestyle. Eating a balanced diet, getting regular exercise, managing stress, getting enough sleep, avoiding harmful habits, and getting regular check-ups and blood tests can all contribute to better health. Don't hesitate to talk to your doctor if you have concerns about your health or if you have symptoms that you are concerned about.  
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Testoster-own Your Life: A Guide to Andropause and How to Deal with it
Q: What is Andropause? A: Andropause, also known as male menopause, is a natural decline in testosterone levels that occurs in men as they age. While not all men will experience Andropause, it can affect those who have low testosterone levels. Q: What are its symptoms? A: Andropause can cause a range of symptoms, including fatigue, decreased muscle mass, decreased bone density, erectile dysfunction, depression, and hot flashes. Other symptoms may include decreased sex drive, decreased energy levels, and difficulty concentrating. Q: Who may be affected? A: Andropause can affect any man who has low testosterone levels, but it is more common in men over the age of 50. Men who smoke, have a poor diet, and do not exercise regularly may be more likely to experience Andropause. Q: When are people affected? A: Men can start to experience Andropause in their 40s, although it is more common in men over the age of 50. The decline in testosterone levels usually occurs slowly over time. Q: What tests may be needed? A: A blood test can measure the levels of testosterone in your body. Your doctor may also perform a physical exam and ask about your symptoms to help diagnose Andropause. Q: When should you talk to a doctor? A: If you are experiencing symptoms of Andropause, you should talk to a doctor. Your doctor can perform tests to determine if your symptoms are caused by Andropause or another condition. Q: What lifestyle changes should you adopt? A: Lifestyle changes can help manage the symptoms of Andropause. Regular exercise can help increase testosterone levels and improve overall health. Eating a healthy diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and lean protein can also help. Avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption can also improve your health and reduce the risk of developing Andropause. Q: What treatments are available? A: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can help increase testosterone levels and manage the symptoms of Andropause. However, HRT is not appropriate for everyone and can have side effects. Your doctor can help you determine if HRT is right for you. To sum up, Andropause is a natural decline in testosterone levels that can cause a range of symptoms. While not all men will experience Andropause, those who do can manage their symptoms with lifestyle changes and, in some cases, hormone replacement therapy. If you are experiencing symptoms of Andropause, talk to your doctor to determine the best course of treatment for you.
May 11,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

General Health

Understanding Thyroid blood tests
Thyroid function tests are a group of blood tests that measure the levels of thyroid hormones in your body. Your thyroid gland produces hormones that help regulate your metabolism, heart rate, body temperature, and other important functions. Thyroid function tests are an important tool in the diagnosis and management of thyroid diseases and conditions. Why you should do it: Your thyroid gland plays a crucial role in many bodily functions, and thyroid function tests can help detect thyroid problems in their early stages. If you have symptoms of thyroid disease, such as fatigue, weight gain or loss, hair loss, or changes in heart rate, your doctor may recommend thyroid function tests. Thyroid function tests are also recommended for people who have a family history of thyroid disease or who have been exposed to radiation or other environmental toxins.

When should you test for it:

Thyroid function tests may be recommended as part of a routine physical exam, especially if you have risk factors for thyroid disease. Your doctor may also recommend thyroid function tests if you have symptoms of thyroid disease, or if you are being treated for a thyroid condition and need to monitor the effectiveness of your treatment.

Diseases or conditions associated with it:

Thyroid function tests can help diagnose a variety of thyroid diseases and conditions, including hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid gland), hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), and thyroid nodules (abnormal growths in the thyroid gland). Thyroid function tests can also help diagnose autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

When is it abnormal:

Abnormal thyroid function test results can indicate thyroid disease or dysfunction. Elevated levels of thyroid hormones, such as thyroxine (T4) or triiodothyronine (T3), can indicate hyperthyroidism, while low levels can indicate hypothyroidism. Abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones, can also indicate thyroid disease or dysfunction.

What to do if it is abnormal:

If your thyroid function test results are abnormal, your doctor may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause of the thyroid problem. Depending on the cause, treatment options may include medication, radioactive iodine therapy, or surgery. It's important to follow your doctor's recommendations and to take steps to protect your thyroid health. In conclusion, thyroid function tests are an important tool in the diagnosis and management of thyroid diseases and conditions. If you have symptoms of thyroid disease, a family history of thyroid disease, or other risk factors, your doctor may recommend thyroid function tests as part of your routine care. If your thyroid function test results are abnormal, further testing and treatment may be necessary to protect your thyroid health.
Mar 30,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA): Understanding the Prostate cancer
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by the prostate gland in men. PSA testing is commonly used to screen for prostate cancer, a disease that affects one in every eight men. However, it's important to note that having an elevated PSA level does not necessarily mean that you have prostate cancer. When to test for PSA: PSA testing is generally recommended for men between the ages of 50 and 70, although it may be recommended earlier if you have a family history of prostate cancer or if you are experiencing symptoms such as frequent urination or difficulty urinating. Conditions associated with PSA: PSA levels can be elevated in non-cancerous conditions as well, such as prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate gland) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition in which the prostate gland enlarges and causes urinary problems. When is it raised: PSA levels can also be raised in men who have prostate cancer, although not all men with prostate cancer will have elevated PSA levels. The level of PSA in the blood can be influenced by a number of factors, such as age, race, and certain medications. What to do if it is raised: If a person's PSA level is found to be elevated, further testing may be recommended by your doctor to determine the cause. This may include a digital rectal exam and/or a prostate biopsy. Treatment options for prostate cancer can include surgery, radiation therapy, or watchful waiting. For non-cancerous conditions such as prostatitis or BPH, treatment options may include medications or surgery. In conclusion, PSA testing can be an important tool in detecting prostate cancer and other conditions affecting the prostate gland. It is important for men to discuss with their doctors whether PSA testing is appropriate for them, and to be aware of the potential risks and benefits associated with the test. Alternatively, you can book a private at-home PSA test to give you peace of mind. If your PSA level is found to be elevated, further testing and treatment options should be discussed with your doctor.
Mar 21,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

General Health

Liver blood tests and why you may need them.
Liver function tests (LFTs) are a group of blood tests that are used to evaluate how well your liver is functioning. These tests measure various enzymes, proteins, and other substances that are produced by the liver. LFTs are an important tool in the diagnosis and management of liver diseases and conditions.

Why you should do it:

Your liver is a vital organ that plays a crucial role in your body's metabolism, digestion, and detoxification. LFTs are a routine part of many physical exams and can help detect liver disease or damage in its early stages. LFTs are also used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for liver diseases.

When should you test for it:

LFTs may be recommended if you have symptoms of liver disease, such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain, or unexplained weight loss. They may also be ordered if you have a history of liver disease or if you are taking medications that can affect liver function. LFTs are also recommended for people who drink alcohol regularly or have a history of heavy alcohol consumption.

Diseases or conditions associated with it:

LFTs can help diagnose a variety of liver diseases and conditions, including hepatitis (inflammation of the liver), cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), and fatty liver disease. LFTs can also detect liver damage caused by alcohol or medications.

When is it abnormal:

Abnormal LFT results can indicate liver disease or damage. The specific tests that are abnormal can provide clues to the underlying cause of the liver problem. For example, elevated levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are often seen in people with liver damage caused by hepatitis or alcohol use. Elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) may indicate blockage of the bile ducts or bone disorders.

What to do if it is abnormal:

If your LFT results are abnormal, your doctor may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause of the liver problem. Depending on the cause, treatment options may include medication, lifestyle changes (such as avoiding alcohol or losing weight), or in severe cases, liver transplantation. It's important to follow your doctor's recommendations and to take steps to protect your liver health. In conclusion, LFTs are an important tool in the diagnosis and management of liver diseases and conditions. If you have a history of liver disease, are taking medications that can affect liver function, or have symptoms of liver disease, your doctor may recommend LFTs as part of your routine care. If your LFT results are abnormal, further testing and treatment may be necessary to protect your liver health.
Mar 21,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Women's Health

Menopausal or Not? Discover the Role of Blood Tests
Menopause is a natural stage of life that marks the end of a woman's reproductive years. It typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, but it can happen earlier or later. Blood tests are used to measure the levels of hormones in a woman's blood to check for menopause.

What it is:

Menopause tests measure the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in a woman's blood. As a woman's ovaries age and become less active, the levels of these hormones increase. The test can help determine whether a woman is approaching or has reached menopause.

Why you should do it:

Menopause blood tests can help confirm whether a woman is going through menopause and can help diagnose other conditions that may cause similar symptoms. If you are experiencing symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, or vaginal dryness, our doctors may recommend a menopause test.

When should you test for it:

These tests are usually done after a woman has missed her period for 12 consecutive months. However, if you are experiencing symptoms of menopause and have not yet missed a period, our doctors may recommend a menopause test. Diseases or conditions associated with it: Menopause is a natural stage of life and is not a disease. However, some women may experience complications or health problems related to menopause, such as osteoporosis (bone loss), cardiovascular disease, or urinary incontinence. When is it abnormal: Abnormal menopause test results can indicate a variety of conditions, including perimenopause (the transitional phase before menopause), premature ovarian failure (when the ovaries stop functioning before the age of 40), or polycystic ovary syndrome (a hormonal disorder that affects the ovaries). In some cases, abnormal menopause test results may also indicate a pituitary gland or hypothalamus problem. What to do if it is abnormal: If your menopause test results are abnormal, our doctors may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause. Depending on the cause, treatment options may include hormone replacement therapy, medication, or lifestyle changes. It's important to follow your doctor's recommendations and to take steps to protect your overall health. In conclusion, menopause tests can help confirm whether a woman is going through menopause and can help diagnose other conditions that may cause similar symptoms. If you are experiencing symptoms of menopause or have concerns about your reproductive health, talk to a doctor or book a blood test about whether a menopause test is right for you. If your menopause test results are abnormal, follow the doctor's recommendations for further testing and treatment to protect your overall health.
Mar 10,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Men's Health

Breaking the Taboo: Understanding Erectile Dysfunction
What is Erectile Dysfunction? Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is a condition where a man has difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection during sexual activity. It's a common condition and affects millions of men worldwide. What causes Erectile Dysfunction? There are several factors that can contribute to Erectile Dysfunction, including physical and psychological causes. Physical causes may include underlying medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease, while psychological causes may include stress, anxiety, and depression. Can blood tests be helpful in diagnosing Erectile Dysfunction? Yes, blood tests can be helpful in diagnosing Erectile Dysfunction. These tests can help identify underlying medical conditions that may be contributing to the condition. What kind of blood tests are done for Erectile Dysfunction?  The main blood tests done for Erectile Dysfunction are testosterone levels, lipid profile, and glucose levels. These tests help determine if any underlying medical conditions are contributing to Erectile Dysfunction. Why is testosterone testing important in the diagnosis of Erectile Dysfunction? Testosterone is a male sex hormone that plays a crucial role in sexual function. Low levels of testosterone can contribute to Erectile Dysfunction. Testosterone testing is important in determining if low testosterone levels are contributing to the condition. What is a lipid profile, and how is it related to Erectile Dysfunction? A lipid profile is a blood test that measures the levels of various types of fats in the blood, including cholesterol and triglycerides. High levels of these fats can contribute to the development of heart disease, which is a risk factor for Erectile Dysfunction. How are glucose levels related to Erectile Dysfunction? High blood sugar levels, which are indicative of diabetes, can damage blood vessels and nerves, leading to Erectile Dysfunction. Glucose testing helps determine if high blood sugar levels are contributing to the condition. What should you do if your blood tests indicate an underlying medical condition? If your blood tests indicate an underlying medical condition, it's important to work with your doctor to manage the condition. This may include lifestyle changes, such as exercise and diet modifications, as well as medications or other medical treatments. Can lifestyle changes help improve Erectile Dysfunction? Yes, lifestyle changes can help improve Erectile Dysfunction, especially if it's caused by underlying medical conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease. Eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and managing stress can all help improve Erectile Dysfunction. Are there any other treatments for Erectile Dysfunction besides medication? Yes, there are other treatments for Erectile Dysfunction, including lifestyle changes, counseling, and the use of vacuum devices or penile injections. Your doctor can help determine the best treatment plan for you based on your individual needs and preferences. In conclusion, Erectile Dysfunction is a common condition that can have both physical and psychological causes. Blood tests, including testosterone levels, lipid profile, and glucose levels, can help identify underlying medical conditions that may be contributing to the condition. If your blood tests indicate an underlying medical condition, it's important to work with your doctor to manage the condition and improve Erectile Dysfunction. Lifestyle changes, such as exercise and diet modifications, can also be helpful in improving the condition.
Mar 03,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Women's Health

Unlocking the Mystery: Understanding Women's Hormones and Fertility Tests
Women's hormones test is a group of blood tests used to measure the levels of various hormones in a woman's body. The most commonly measured hormones include estrogen, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). If you are experiencing symptoms related to hormonal imbalances, such as hot flashes, irregular periods, or infertility, a women's hormone test can provide valuable information about your hormone levels. This information can help your doctor diagnose the underlying cause of your symptoms and develop a treatment plan. The timing of a women's hormone test depends on the specific test being performed. Some tests can be done at any time, while others should be done on specific days of your menstrual cycle. Women's hormone tests can help diagnose a range of conditions related to hormonal imbalances, including menopause, infertility, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abnormal women's hormone test results can indicate a variety of conditions, including menopause, PCOS, and infertility. High or low levels of certain hormones can also indicate a hormonal imbalance, which can cause a range of symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, and mood changes. If your women's hormone test results are abnormal, your doctor may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause. Depending on the cause, treatment options may include medication, hormone replacement therapy, or lifestyle changes. In conclusion, women's hormone tests can provide valuable information about your hormone levels and help diagnose a range of conditions related to hormonal imbalances. If you are experiencing symptoms related to hormonal imbalances, talk to your doctor about whether a women's hormone test is right for you. If your test results are abnormal, follow your doctor's recommendations for further testing and treatment to optimise your health and well-being.
Feb 22,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

General HealthWomen's Health

Understanding the Reasons Behind Weight Loss Plateaus and Strategies to Overcome Them
Why can't I lose weight? Losing weight can be a challenging process, and it can be frustrating when you are not seeing results. While diet and exercise play a significant role in weight loss, there may be underlying medical conditions that can make it difficult to lose weight. Blood tests such as Hormones, HbA1c and TSH can be helpful in finding a cause for your weight loss struggles. Why are hormones important? Hormones are chemical messengers in the body that help regulate various functions, including metabolism and weight. Hormone imbalances can affect weight loss, causing difficulty losing weight or even weight gain. Blood tests can help measure hormone levels, including FSH, LH, oestrogen, progesterone, testosterone, and identify any imbalances that may be causing weight loss struggles. What is HbA1c? HbA1c is a blood test that measures the average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months. High HbA1c levels can indicate diabetes or pre-diabetes, which can affect weight loss efforts. What is TSH? Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. TSH levels can be measured through a blood test and can indicate if your thyroid gland is functioning properly. If your thyroid gland is producing too much or too little thyroid hormones, you may experience weight loss difficulties. What should I do if I am struggling to lose weight? If you are struggling to lose weight despite making lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, it is important to speak with your doctor. Your doctor may recommend blood tests such as Hormones, HbA1c and TSH to help identify a medical cause for your weight loss struggles. Depending on the results of your blood tests, your doctor may recommend additional testing or refer you to a specialist. How can I improve my weight loss efforts? While there may be underlying medical conditions that can make it difficult to lose weight, there are also several lifestyle changes you can make to improve your weight loss efforts, including:
  • Eating a healthy, balanced diet
  • Incorporating regular exercise into your routine
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Managing stress through relaxation techniques such as yoga or meditation
  • Avoiding processed and sugary foods
  • Drinking plenty of water
In conclusion, struggling to lose weight can be frustrating, and it is important to understand that there may be underlying medical conditions that can make weight loss difficult. Blood tests such as Hormones, HbA1c and TSH,  can help identify these medical conditions and guide treatment options. By making lifestyle changes and addressing any underlying medical conditions, you can improve your weight loss efforts and achieve your weight loss goals.  
Feb 16,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Women's Health

Ovulation: Tracking Your Fertility with Blood Tests
What is Ovulation and when do you ovulate? Ovulation is the process of releasing a mature egg  from the ovary into the fallopian tube. This process usually happens once in every menstrual cycle and is necessary for conception to take place. The ovary, which contains thousands of immature eggs, starts to prepare an egg for release at the beginning of the menstrual cycle. The ovary releases the egg which travels down the fallopian tube, towards the uterus. The timing of ovulation can vary from woman to woman. An ovulation blood test can help to identify ovulation by measuring hormones in your blood. What is an Ovulation test? An ovulation blood test, also known as a Day 21 progesterone test, is used to measure the levels of progesterone in a woman's body. Progesterone is a hormone produced by the ovaries after ovulation, and its levels can provide valuable information about fertility. Why should I do an ovulation blood test? If you are trying to conceive, a blood test can help determine whether you are ovulating regularly and can also provide information about the quality of your eggs. Additionally, if you have irregular periods or suspect you are not ovulating regularly, a blood test can help diagnose underlying fertility issues. When should I do an ovulation blood test? A blood test should be done on Day 21 of your menstrual cycle, about seven days after ovulation. However, if you have irregular periods or do not know when you ovulate, your doctor may recommend monitoring your hormone levels with multiple tests throughout your cycle. What are the diseases or conditions associated with an abnormal  test? Abnormal Day 21 progesterone levels could be a sign of a range of conditions, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or premature ovarian failure. High or low levels of progesterone can also indicate a hormonal imbalance, which can affect fertility. When is an ovulation blood test abnormal? The considered abnormal if the progesterone levels are too high or too low. High levels may mean pregnancy or a hormonal imbalance, while low levels may mean an issue with ovulation. What should I do if my  blood test is abnormal? If your Day 21 progesterone levels are abnormal, your doctor may recommend further testing to determine the underlying cause. Treatment options may include medication to regulate ovulation.  It is important to follow your doctor's advice for further testing and treatment.
Feb 12,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Fitness & NutritionGeneral Health

Unraveling the Mystery: Testing for conditions for Better Sleep
Why can't I sleep? Not being able to sleep can be frustrating, and it can impact your daily life in many ways. There are several reasons why you may be experiencing sleep difficulties, including stress, anxiety, poor sleep hygiene, and an unhealthy diet. However, if you have tried making lifestyle changes and you are still having trouble sleeping, it may be time to look for an underlying medical cause. Blood tests such as Hormones, Cortisol, TSH, and can be helpful in finding a cause for your sleep difficulties. Why are hormones important for sleep? Hormones are chemical messengers in the body that help regulate various functions, including sleep. Hormone imbalances can affect sleep, causing sleep difficulties such as insomnia. Blood tests can help measure hormone levels, including estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, and identify any imbalances that may be causing sleep difficulties.  What is cortisol? Cortisol is a hormone produced by the adrenal gland that is involved in the body's stress response. Cortisol levels can be measured through a blood test and can indicate if your body is experiencing chronic stress, which can affect sleep. What is TSH? Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. TSH levels can be measured through a blood test and can indicate if your thyroid gland is functioning properly. If your thyroid gland is producing too much or too little thyroid hormones, you may experience sleep difficulties. What should I do if I am having trouble sleeping? If you have tried making lifestyle changes and you are still having trouble sleeping, it is important to speak with your doctor. Your doctor may recommend blood tests such as Hormones, Cortisol and TSH, to help identify a medical cause for your sleep difficulties. Depending on the results of your blood tests, your doctor may recommend additional testing or refer you to a specialist. How can I improve my sleep? While there may be underlying medical conditions that can cause sleep difficulties, there are also several lifestyle changes you can make to improve your sleep, including:
  • Establishing a consistent sleep schedule
  • Creating a relaxing sleep environment
  • Avoiding caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine before bedtime
  • Exercising regularly
  • Managing stress through relaxation techniques such as yoga or meditation
  • Limiting daytime naps
Feb 03,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Women's Health

Measuring your egg reserve with The Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH)
When it comes to fertility, knowing the status of your ovarian reserve can be crucial. AMH blood tests are a popular way to get a quick and reliable assessment of your ovarian reserve. In this article, we'll take a closer look at AMH blood tests, what they measure, and what the results can tell you. What is AMH? Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) is a protein produced by the ovarian follicles in women. It helps regulate the development and maturation of eggs in the ovaries. AMH levels tend to decline as women age, which can indicate a decrease in ovarian reserve and potential fertility. What is an AMH blood test? An AMH blood test is a simple blood test that measures the level of AMH in your bloodstream. It's typically performed on the third day of your menstrual cycle when your hormone levels are at their lowest. The test involves drawing a small amount of blood and analyzing it in a laboratory. What do the results mean? The results of an AMH blood test can provide insight into your ovarian reserve and potential fertility. Higher AMH levels generally indicate a greater number of ovarian follicles and better ovarian reserve. Conversely, lower AMH levels may suggest a decreased number of ovarian follicles and diminished ovarian reserve. It's important to note that AMH levels can vary from person to person and may be affected by factors such as age, hormonal imbalances, and certain medical conditions. Your healthcare provider can help you interpret your results and determine the best course of action. Who should consider an AMH blood test? AMH blood tests are typically recommended for women who are experiencing infertility or who are planning to undergo fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). However, the test can also be useful for women who are curious about their ovarian reserve or who are considering delaying pregnancy. Takeaway If you're curious about your ovarian reserve or potential fertility, an AMH blood test may be a useful tool. By measuring the level of AMH in your blood, this simple test can provide valuable information about your reproductive health. If you're interested in learning more, talk to your healthcare provider about whether an AMH blood test is right for you.
Jan 17,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Fitness & Nutrition

Why Am I So Tired All the Time? Exploring the Causes and Solutions
Why do I feel tired all the time? Feeling tired all the time can be frustrating, and it can impact your daily life in many ways. There are several reasons why you may be experiencing fatigue, including poor sleep quality, stress, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy diet. However, if you have tried making lifestyle changes and you are still feeling tired, it may be time to look for an underlying medical cause. Blood tests such as a Full Blood Count, TSH, and Vitamin D3 can be helpful in finding a cause for your tiredness. What is a Full Blood Count? A Full Blood Count (FBC) is a blood test that measures the levels of different types of blood cells in your body, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. An FBC can help identify a variety of medical conditions that can cause fatigue, such as anemia, infections, and certain types of cancer. What is TSH? Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. TSH levels can be measured through a blood test and can indicate if your thyroid gland is functioning properly. If your thyroid gland is not producing enough thyroid hormones, you may experience fatigue and other symptoms. Why is Vitamin D3 important? Vitamin D3 is a nutrient that helps your body absorb calcium and maintain healthy bones. However, it also plays a role in many other functions in the body, including supporting the immune system and regulating mood. Vitamin D3 deficiency is common, especially in people who do not get enough sunlight or have a poor diet. Fatigue is a common symptom of Vitamin D3 deficiency. What are some other medical conditions that can cause fatigue? There are several other medical conditions that can cause fatigue, including:
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Sleep disorders such as sleep apnea
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Diabetes
  • Iron deficiency
What should I do if I am feeling tired all the time? If you have tried making lifestyle changes and you are still feeling tired, it is important to speak with your doctor. Your doctor may recommend blood tests such as an FBC, TSH, and Vitamin D3 to help identify a medical cause for your fatigue. Depending on the results of your blood tests, your doctor may recommend additional testing or refer you to a specialist. How can I prevent fatigue? While there may be underlying medical conditions that can cause fatigue, there are also several lifestyle changes you can make to prevent fatigue, including:
  • Getting enough sleep each night
  • Eating a healthy and balanced diet
  • Staying hydrated by drinking plenty of water
  • Exercising regularly
  • Managing stress through relaxation techniques such as yoga or meditation
  • Limiting caffeine and alcohol intake
In conclusion, feeling tired all the time can be frustrating and impact your daily life. While there are several lifestyle changes you can make to prevent fatigue, if you have tried these changes and are still feeling tired, it may be time to look for an underlying medical cause. Blood tests such as a Full Blood Count, TSH, and Vitamin D3 can be helpful in identifying a medical cause for your fatigue. Speak with your doctor if you are experiencing fatigue to determine the best course of action.
Jan 15,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE  

Cancer ScreeningWomen's Health

Understanding the ovarian cancer tumour marker

Ovarian cancer symptoms:

Ovarian cancer can be difficult to detect in its early stages because the symptoms are often vague and can be caused by other conditions as well. However, some common symptoms of
ovarian cancer include:
  • Abdominal bloating or swelling
  • Pelvic pain or pressure
  • Difficulty eating or feeling full quickly
  • Changes in bowel habits, such as constipation
  • Frequent need to urinate
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge
It's important to note that these symptoms may also be caused by other medical conditions, so it's important to see a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms for an extended period of time or if they worsen over time. Regular gynaecological check-ups and screenings can also help with early detection of ovarian cancer. The CA-125 blood test is a widely used tool in healthcare that helps diagnose and monitor certain medical conditions. It measures the amount of a protein called cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) in the blood, which is produced by cells in the female reproductive system. In this article, we will explain what the CA-125 blood test is, when it is recommended, what diseases or conditions it is associated with, when it is raised, and what to do if it is raised. What is CA-125? CA-125 is a protein that is normally produced by cells in the female reproductive system, including the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and lining of the uterus. It is also produced by some other tissues, such as the lining of the chest and abdominal cavity. Small amounts of CA-125 are normally present in the blood of healthy women, but levels can be elevated in certain medical conditions. When should I test for it? The CA-125 blood test is primarily used as a diagnostic tool for ovarian cancer, which is the most deadly form of gynecologic cancer. It is also used to monitor the progression of ovarian cancer and the effectiveness of treatment. The test may be recommended for women who have symptoms of ovarian cancer, such as abdominal bloating, pelvic pain, and difficulty eating, as well as those who are at high risk of developing the disease due to family history or genetic factors. In addition to ovarian cancer, the CA-125 blood test may also be used to diagnose and monitor other medical conditions, including endometriosis, uterine fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, and certain types of lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers. What are the diseases or conditions associated with it? The CA-125 blood test is primarily associated with ovarian cancer, as elevated levels of CA-125 are often a sign of the disease. However, it is important to note that elevated CA-125 levels can also be caused by other medical conditions, including benign ovarian tumors, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and pelvic inflammatory disease. In some cases, even pregnancy and menstruation can cause temporary elevations in CA-125 levels. When is it raised? CA-125 levels can be raised for a variety of reasons, but in most cases, elevations are due to medical conditions that affect the female reproductive system. As mentioned above, ovarian cancer is the most common cause of elevated CA-125 levels, but other gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and uterine fibroids can also cause elevations. In addition, certain types of lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers can also cause elevations in CA-125 levels. What should I do if it is raised? If your CA-125 levels are raised, it is important to remember that this does not necessarily mean that you have ovarian cancer or any other medical condition. Elevated CA-125 levels can be caused by a variety of factors, and additional tests may be needed to determine the underlying cause. A Rainbow doctor may recommend further testing, such as imaging scans or a biopsy, to help diagnose or rule out certain medical conditions. If a medical condition is identified, a Rainbow doctor will work with you to develop an appropriate treatment plan. In the case of ovarian cancer, treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, depending on the stage and extent of the disease. It is important to remember that early detection is key when it comes to treating ovarian cancer, so if you are at high risk or have symptoms, it is important to speak with your doctor about screening and testing options. In conclusion, the CA-125 blood test is an important tool in healthcare that can help diagnose and monitor certain medical conditions, including ovarian cancer.
Jan 05,2023 - Dr Raja Mohan
READ MORE